Thursday, March 12, 2020

Free Essays on Great Gatsby - Common Traits Shared by the Novels Women

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby has endured as a classic glimpse into a period of time that is now referred to as the Roaring 20s – an American decade marked by extravagance, self-gratification and indifference. As Americans strove to find and claim for themselves a piece of what they considered to be the â€Å"American Dream†, they inevitably got lost in the process, and Fitzgerald created several poignant and distinct characters in The Great Gatsby who epitomized the era and his beliefs in how the era affected people. On its simplest level, The Great Gatsby is Nick Carraway’s narration and recollection of events stemming from his meeting and subsequent interaction with Jay Gatsby during the summer of 1922 in Long Island, New York. Nick Carraway, too, was seeking his piece of the American Dream by moving to New York from the Midwest to take job as a bond salesman â€Å"†¦I decided to go east and learn the bond business. Everyone I knew was in the bond business†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (p. 7). However, Nick is only person pursuing a better and larger life who doesn’t get caught up in the shallow, materialistic notions of most people doing the same thing. For instance, Nick ends up renting a house in West Egg that is â€Å"a weather beaten cardboard bungalow at eighty a month† and is â€Å"†¦squeezed between two huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season.† (pp. 8-9). Nick’s next door neighbor is Jay Gatsby. Nick’s â€Å"second cousin once removed† was Daisy Buchanan who lived with her husband Tom in East Egg, just â€Å"[a]cross the courtesy bay† from West Egg (p. 10). After getting settled, Nick visits the Buchanans and meets Daisy Buchanan â€Å"whom I scarcely knew at all† (p. 11) and Daisy’s friend, Jordan Baker. Nick’s impression of these two women in particular, as well as the others he encounters during his brief stay in New York, are noteworthy in that they demonstrate the vapidity and emptiness o... Free Essays on Great Gatsby - Common Traits Shared by the Novel's Women Free Essays on Great Gatsby - Common Traits Shared by the Novel's Women F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby has endured as a classic glimpse into a period of time that is now referred to as the Roaring 20s – an American decade marked by extravagance, self-gratification and indifference. As Americans strove to find and claim for themselves a piece of what they considered to be the â€Å"American Dream†, they inevitably got lost in the process, and Fitzgerald created several poignant and distinct characters in The Great Gatsby who epitomized the era and his beliefs in how the era affected people. On its simplest level, The Great Gatsby is Nick Carraway’s narration and recollection of events stemming from his meeting and subsequent interaction with Jay Gatsby during the summer of 1922 in Long Island, New York. Nick Carraway, too, was seeking his piece of the American Dream by moving to New York from the Midwest to take job as a bond salesman â€Å"†¦I decided to go east and learn the bond business. Everyone I knew was in the bond business†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (p. 7). However, Nick is only person pursuing a better and larger life who doesn’t get caught up in the shallow, materialistic notions of most people doing the same thing. For instance, Nick ends up renting a house in West Egg that is â€Å"a weather beaten cardboard bungalow at eighty a month† and is â€Å"†¦squeezed between two huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season.† (pp. 8-9). Nick’s next door neighbor is Jay Gatsby. Nick’s â€Å"second cousin once removed† was Daisy Buchanan who lived with her husband Tom in East Egg, just â€Å"[a]cross the courtesy bay† from West Egg (p. 10). After getting settled, Nick visits the Buchanans and meets Daisy Buchanan â€Å"whom I scarcely knew at all† (p. 11) and Daisy’s friend, Jordan Baker. Nick’s impression of these two women in particular, as well as the others he encounters during his brief stay in New York, are noteworthy in that they demonstrate the vapidity and emptiness o...

Monday, February 24, 2020

The iliad and the odyssey Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

The iliad and the odyssey - Essay Example Composed in the dactylic hexameter poetic style, this too is a lengthy poem, stretching to 12,110 lines. The plot of Odyssey is centered on Greek war hero Odysseus and his beautiful wife Penelope. Although both these masterpieces of Western literature were written in pre-Christian times when the written tradition was still in its infancy, they still remain relevant today. Events such as war, love, betrayal, bravery, etc are universal human experiences than span centuries and continents. While some of the specific details of the two epic poems might be irrelevant in contemporary times, their essence remains highly relevant. What it shows is that Western civilization has not changed drastically since the beginning of recorded history; and that societies continue to be disturbed by greed, war, lust, betrayal, etc. In other words, some of the vices and failings displayed by characters in the two poems are still afflicting humanity today. In this respect, a careful study of the interpersonal, social and political aspects of the two epic poems can lead us to insights into human nature. Apart from this practical utility of the two great epics, the literary techniques employed by Hom er in composing the works are very instructive for current generation of writers. For example, the non-linear plot structure employed by Homer is a highly sophisticated narrative structure, which finds application in plays, motion pictures and novels of

Saturday, February 8, 2020

In depth analysis about article Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

In depth analysis about article - Essay Example But at the same time, author’s view on internationalization is also pertinent because it helps the nations to maintain their autonomy vis-a-vis their fiscal policies and economic welfare and equitable distribution of wealth for the wider welfare of their people. The article emphasizes that globalization promotes economic integration across the globe through free trade and liberalization. It has resulted in diminishing national boundaries and brought in influx of foreign trade, both in term of goods and human capital. Daly believes that it undermines the national interests of the individual nations. But it nevertheless greatly facilitates the development process in the developing and under developed countries which need to be exposed to the opportunities for improving their standard of living. The developing world has indeed gained through globalization! Daly also asserts that internationalization would be more relevant because it helps to maintain national identity but promote s international relation through trade, treaties, alliances and protocols etc. The author has unconsciously supported the process of globalization in his emphasis for internationalization! When trade and business alliances are encouraged across nations, inter-dependency of economic units become vital ingredients of the developing relationship.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Adults with Learning Disabilities Essay Example for Free

Adults with Learning Disabilities Essay The discourse of ‘learning disabilities’ is now being used to challenge a wide range of acts and practices, including violence and intimidation, non-consenting sexual acts, the bullying of less resilient people by more able service users, unacceptably deprived physical or social environments and financial exploitation or fraud. Some argue that it should include all abuses of human rights. Clearly, these issues are not new as the following essay illustrates, and historically some of these practices have been hidden within service cultures while others have been quite open but variously rationalized as ‘behavior modification’, ‘relationships’, ‘control and restraint’, or ‘not giving in to attention seeking’. Abuse was regarded as a central, and inevitable, feature of institutionalized provision in influential models such as that of Goffman (1961) and Wolfensberger (1975 and 1980) within an analysis whose focus was on organizations and ideology. The new discourse is much more personalized and within it the focus is on the experience of the victim. This has some advantages for individuals and highlights some dilemmas for service organizations. It makes clear that people with learning disabilities are harmed, as any individual would be, by personal or sexual violence or exploitation. Harm is deemed equivalent whoever has caused it, for example whether it has been perpetrated by another service user, a member of staff or a stranger. This way of framing harmful acts highlights conflicts of interest between service users: the discourse of ‘challenging behavior’ for example, designed to neutralize the stigma of difficult behavior, inadvertently deflects from and discounts the experience of those on the receiving end of difficult behavior. Naming these acts as abusive confronts service agencies with the need for specialized, safe (expensive) placements for those who present a risk to others. Men with learning disabilities who have difficult sexual behaviors, for example, are often placed alongside very vulnerable people, their needs for asylum taking precedence over the safety of more vulnerable people (Thompson and Brown 1998). But while this acknowledgement is a step forward for individuals ,the new discourse risks personalizing forms of mistreatment that arise out of societal and structural inequalities. At an individual level, when issues of power are overlooked or neutralized, abusive and exploitative interactions can be explained away as relationships of choice. At a service level, new fault-lines between agencies and between purchasers, providers and regulators set up contingencies that make abuse more likely and less visible. At a societal level, there is growing inequality between the pay and working conditions of managerial, professional and so-called ‘unqualified’ staff within and across the statutory, private (for-profit) and voluntary (not-for-profit) sectors. Gender and race exacerbate the unequal position of direct care staff and the disproportionate responsibility that falls on them. This paper divides into two parts. First, I shall review the current usage of the term ‘learning disabilities’, looking at how it is being defined and categorized. Second, I will outline what is emerging as good practice in this field. WHAT DOES A LEARNING DISABILITY LOOK LIKE? Let me explain this with an exaomple: Saras lifelong difficulty with reading and writing had nothing to do with not being smart. Most individuals who have a learning disability are of average to above average intelligence and therefore have the intellectual potential to succeed at school and in careers. But they often do not reach this potential. While effort and motivation are important for success, it is clearly unfair to say of someone with a learning disability that he or she just needs to try harder. No matter how hard Sara worked, her problems did not go away. We know that a learning disability is caused by specific dysfunction within the central nervous system. The central nervous system, made up of the brain and the spinal cord, controls everything we do: our ability to process and think about language and to express ourselves verbally, as well as our ability to process nonverbal information, including art or music. Saras symptoms included reversing or rotating numbers (6 for 9), letters (b for d;p for q), and words (was for saw; on for no) when writing; omitting letters and sounds; and making sound and word substitutions when reading (tril for trial;then for there). Such problems make it difficult to decode words, and these decoding errors are most evident when reading aloud. Though never diagnosed, Saras symptoms became evident in first grade, when formal reading instruction began. As we learn to read we must of course master the alphabet, which is like a code, and learn the relationship between letters and sounds. Reading is a process of decoding the clusters of letters, converting them into words, and then attaching meaning to the words. In many cases, problems with phonological processing the ability to receive, transform, remember, and retrieve the sounds of oral language interfere with the acquisition of reading skills. Phonological processing involves the ability to separate a word into its component parts or blend sounds to construct a word. Problems with these skills make it very hard for the beginning reader to achieve fluency. Comprehension of written material depends on accurate and fluent decoding, a good vocabulary, and comprehension of the grammatical structure of sentences. When these skills are not developed that is, when they are slow and labored the reader must devote more energy and effort to identifying and comprehending each individual word, rather than constructing meaning from an entire paragraph or from general context. For many years, researchers believed that the reader automatically moved from reading the words on a page to comprehending, without participating in the process of constructing meaning. But recent research points to the fact that the reader plays an active role: using background knowledge about the subject, calling on appropriate strategies for both decoding and comprehension, and applying the right amount of attention and concentration. Reading strategies are now considered essential components of the reading process. These might include paraphrasing while reading or summarizing afterward to help with comprehension. Competent readers are able to evaluate the reading task and select strategies that are a good fit or match to the task. In Saras case, she read slowly and had to reread material several times, so she found it difficult to comprehend content or recall important facts when questioned about them later. Unlike good readers, she did not rely on strategies that could help her. She also struggled with writing. Many times she was ashamed to submit patient reports because she knew they were filled with spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors and were not organized or structured well. Her reports never reflected her knowledge or keen insight into patient care. Writing problems can be seen at any age, although they become more evident as academic or work demands increase. While Sara knew what she wanted to say, she had trouble getting started, focusing on the essential facts, and editing effectively. She tended to use the same words over and over. This was so different from her spoken language, which was rich and varied. Not surprisingly, it took her a long time and a good deal of effort to complete her reports. Her mathematical skills, though, were more than adequate. But there are people with learning disabilities who have problems understanding mathematical concepts or difficulty solving verbal or written mathematical problems. These problems may stem from more than one source, including inadequate spatial or directional sense and difficulty understanding abstract symbols or the language of mathematics. To use a basic example, someone who does not have a good understanding of concepts such as plus and minus is going to find it hard to identify the process needed to solve a mathematical problem. Learning strategies will be of great help to this person. Sara was also troubled by her erratic performance at work. Some days, she would be fine. But when she was fatigued or stressed, she found her attention was poor and she made more than the usual number of errors. At these times, she did not feel in control and usually needed to take a break and call on the support of friends to help her get back on track. While Sara felt her social life to be strength, some individuals who have learning disabilities have difficulty in social situations because they cannot perceive others needs and make or keep friends. Relationships with family and friends and associates on the job may suffer. As a way of compensating, an individual may avoid social situations altogether and thus become isolated. Others may struggle with low self-esteem and a lack of assertiveness, which can lead to self-fulfilling prophecies of failure. Moreover, repeated negative experiences in school and at home can discourage an individual from even trying. Many individuals who have learning disabilities have difficulty planning ahead and then evaluating their performance in academic courses or work-related tasks. Planning involves the ability to determine the outlines of a task and the skills it will require. Planning helps us generate strategies or know when to ask for outside help. We are not always conscious of initiating this type of planning because so many tasks are performed automatically, such as remembering a frequently called phone number by using a mnemonic, or writing notes in a book or on a memo. But when tasks are new or complex, active planning is needed. Other learning problems may stem from an inability to manage ones time effectively to get something done on schedule. For example, many college students do not leave sufficient time to research and write a term paper, and end up frantically completing it the night before it is due. Or a manager may delay writing a budget or marketing report, finding it hard to begin. In order to use strategies at school, at home, or on the job, we need to be aware of ourselves as learners. Researchers have suggested that each of us has our own built-in executive function that directs and controls our actions. If this executive is efficient and aware of individual skills and the strategies needed to accomplish a task, the appropriate plan of action can be put into effect. If the plan is unsuccessful, then the executive reevaluates and initiates a new course of action. Individuals who have learning disabilities have a less efficient executive, the theory goes, and are therefore less able to generate and use effective strategies in their personal and professional lives. In addition to learning disabilities, a large number of adults suffer from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD affects an individuals ability to focus and concentrate on school or work tasks, and to make good use of strategies. The struggle to achieve is so much harder with the added burden of ADHD. Although external factors do not cause a learning disability, we know that they do play a significant role in learning. It is well documented that the environment we live and work in influences and helps to shape our learning patterns, behavior, and sense of self. Research has consistently shown that the type and quality of support provided both at school and within the home are strong determinants of success in school, at work, or in ones personal life. For example, a supportive family, early identification of learning problems, and appropriate intervention may make all the difference in helping an individual compensate for the disability. Learning disabilities are found throughout the world and in all socioeconomic groups they are not bound by culture or language. Approximately the same numbers of males as females have learning disabilities, and the problem tends to run in families. Many prominent figures in politics, science, and the arts are reported to have had a learning disability, among them Nelson Rockefeller, Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, and Auguste Rodin. Einstein, for example, was described as having difficulty learning a foreign language and mathematics of all things! He also struggled with other academic subjects and with writing. All adults face the challenges and rewards of employment, home and family, leisure pursuits, community involvement, emotional and physical health, and personal responsibility and relationships. Adults who have learning disabilities must manage these life demands with an added set of problems. Society expects adults to be self-supporting, to function within a community, and to exhibit appropriate social behavior. Typically, to be self-supporting one must be employed. Employment for most adults spans a long period of time. It may begin with the exit from high school and continue for fifty or more years. While research on the employment of adults who have learning disabilities is sparse, and the findings that are available reflect the heterogeneity of the population, the information reported is unfortunately discouraging. It suggests that individuals with learning disabilities, as a group, show higher rates of unemployment, have jobs of lower status, receive lower pay, and change jobs more frequently than those without learning disabilities. Of course, there are many individuals at all levels of the workforce who do attain professional success. Further, there are well-documented accounts of persons with learning disabilities throughout history who have made significant contributions to society, among the most notable being Einstein, Edison, Churchill, and Rockefeller. It is important to keep in mind that adults who have learning disabilities who have above average intelligence, come from middle to higher economic backgrounds, and/or have completed postsecondary education, have higher rates of employment, higher job status, and greater job satisfaction than this research indicates. Those who graduate from college are much more likely to hold professional or managerial positions, for example, than those who have only a high school diploma. What makes success on the job so difficult for some people with learning disabilities? For one thing, persistent problems with reading, writing, and arithmetic can interfere with their work. Many report that they continue to struggle with decoding skills, sight vocabulary, and reading rate. Banking tasks and money management often bring out their troubles with arithmetic. Spelling is frequently reported to be the biggest problem of all. The level of basic skills that is required in the current job market is expanding to include more abstract abilities. Employers want their workers not only to be proficient in basic skills but also to be able to use these skills effectively and efficiently to solve on-the-job problems. Employers want the people they hire to be able to read for information, to analyze and synthesize the material, and apply the material read to on-the-job situations. They further expect employees to analyze problems, formulate solutions, and communicate that process, in writing, to others. Workplace mathematics, like reading and writing, also requires identification of the problem, analysis, and then the ability to find a solution. Employers further expect good interpersonal skills. The ability to use technology and information systems is becoming more essential as well. To do all of these things efficiently and effectively, workers must have mastered basic skills and be able to apply thinking skills. They also need personal qualities such as individual responsibility, self-esteem, and self management. The nature of a learning disability may affect the development of some of these competencies. For example, because of years of struggle and failure, self-esteem may be low and self-monitoring skills may not be functioning effectively. Employers often do not understand what a learning disability is, thus making it even more difficult for the adults with learning disabilities whom they supervise. Because employers cannot see the disability and may have limited knowledge about learning disabilities, they may find it difficult to understand that the problems are real. Therefore, they may fail to provide the necessary accommodations and supportive environment. They may often fail to recognize that, with assistance, workers who have learning disabilities may be tremendous assets to the company. A learning disability is a lifelong condition. Some adults, by the time they have completed their formal education, have learned to compensate for their difficulties. For many others, difficulties continue and to varying degrees impact on careers, social relationships, and activities of daily living. There are adults who were diagnosed as children and received services under the guidelines of PL 94-142. But more and more adults, who never knew why school was so hard, are now addressing the problem by initiating an assessment and seeking services to help them cope with their disabilities. Adults who have learning disabilities are a heterogeneous group. Some struggle with reading and writing, some with mathematical tasks, some with the basic challenges of daily life. There are adults who have learning disabilities who have trouble finding and keeping a job; others are professionally successful yet cannot seem to develop a satisfying social life. And there are those who seem to have few problems as they successfully negotiate the range of lifes demands. Adults who have learning disabilities are not merely children with learning disabilities grown up. The impact of having a learning disability differs at each stage of development. And adulthood itself has many stages, each with its unique challenges. Satisfaction or dissatisfaction at one stage does not guarantee the same degree of adjustment at another. At one point, the adult might deal with self-identity, at another with employment and economic independence, and still another with personal responsibility and relationships. As a group, adults who have learning disabilities represent a broad spectrum of the population. We see individuals of different ages, from different socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural groups. We see different clusters of social and learning problems that affect education, social, personal, and occupational adjustments. The field now recognizes the unique needs of the adult who has learning disabilities, and as such has responded by providing legal protection, programs, services, and an ever-developing information base. Where do we stand today? References: Erikson, E. H. 1968. Identity: Youth and crisis. New York: Norton. Hallahan, D. P. , Lloyd, J. W. , Kauffman, J. M. , Weiss, M. P. , Martinez, E. A. (2005). Learning disabilities: Foundations, characteristics, and effective teaching (3rd ed. ). Toronto: Pearson Education, Inc. Johnson, D. J. , Blalock, J. W. (1987). Adults with learning disabilities: Clinical studies. Orlando: Grune Stratton. Jordan, D. R. (1996). Teaching adults with learning disabilities. The professional practices in adult education and human resource development series. Malabar, Fla: Krieger Pub. Shapiro, J. , Rich, R. (1999). Facing learning disabilities in the adult years. New York: Oxford University Press. Wong, B. Y. L. (1998). Learning about learning disabilities. San Diego: Academic Press.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Advantages and Feasibility of Using Synthetic Oils in Production Vehicles :: Synthetic Motor Oil

ABSTRACT During a recent company meeting, we discussed the benefits of substituting a synthetic based motor oil for the conventional petroleum based oil now used in our new production vehicles. This report investigates the advantages and feasibility of using synthetic oils. Several oil manufacturers, as well as top engineers and engine builders, have submitted first hand information on this topic and strongly support the use of synthetic oil. The use of this product will benefit our company in may ways, Singlehandedly, synthetic oils will boost power and fuel economy of every one of our vehicles, giving us high marks with prospective buyers of new vehicles as well as environmental agencies. This product is economically advantageous, not just to initially implement, but also on a long term basis. Synthetic oils release less contaminants to the atmosphere, are changed less frequently and protect an engine much better than conventional oils. I recommend the immediate change to the use of synthetic motor oil for our new vehicles. The future lies with the best available technology, and synthetic oils are vital in keeping this edge. 2.0 INTRODUCTION Synthetic oil is a man made motor oil for use in almost every kind of internal combustion engine. Its material properties enable it to provide better fuel economy, more power and give off less contaminants to the atmosphere. It is recommended that all of our new vehicles use synthetic oil. Laboratory tests and scientific fact, as well as testimonials from famous engineers and engine builders, all confirm the superiority of these oils. In this report I will discuss the capabilities and properties of synthetic oil. I will also cover their economic and other beneficial advantages over conventional petroleum based oil that is now used. 3.0 BODY Today, the product undergoing considerable scrutiny is synthetic oil. After all, your old Chevy went over 100,000 miles on regular old 30 weight oil, so why take a risk on some man-made snake oil that might ruin your engine? These were probably legitimate concerns when synthetics first hit the market over a decade ago. But like anything else technical, synthetic oils have advanced and keep advancing all the time. Would your opinion of synthetics change if you were told you car's engine and drivetrain might last three times as long if you used them? The backbone of powertrain protection is proper lubrication and minimized heat.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Ramji Bhai Vasava Essay

G.H.Patel Post Graduate Institute of Business Management, Vallabh Vidhyanagar, Anand In the undivided Bombay province was worked out to build earthen dams and problems faced while building a dam across the rivers Lokmata and Sadmata in northern Gujarat and further issues encountered while a proposal is made to raise the control levels of it. The objective of the case is to maximize the irrigation potential of the dam while respecting the religious sentiments of the people. The options are either to implement the former plan in its present form or the latter by convincing the people of its benefits and deal with the issues faced. The conclusion is to try and implement the new plan resulting in maximization of irrigation and revenues. PROPOSAL 1 PROPOSAL 2 Approximate cost – 1.7 Approximate cost – 1.9 Water impound – 4700 Water impound –5700 Full supply level -592 Full supply level-595 Highest flood level-596 highest flood level-606 OBJECTIVES * Government aim for economic development through agricultural development. * Build the dam PROBLEM * Opposition of people to temple getting submerged * People getting affected due to submerge of villages CONSTRAIN * Location of dam CRITERIA * Maximum irrigation * Minimum people affected * Maximum returns * Minimum time * Minimum cost PRIORITY * Minimum people affected * Minimum cost * Minimum time * Minimum returns * Maximum irrigation ALTERNATIVES * Convincing villages to shift temple * Resettlement of affected people * Raising height of the temple ACTION PLAN Government should follow proposal 1 as temple was saved using gates from flood so that minimum people are affected so the cost incurred is also low and the time required is minimum and also there is irrigation which leads to economic development. CONTINGENCY PLAN * Raising height of the temple * Go with proposal 2 if proposal 1 does not work

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Xerox Is A Leading Business Process Outsourcing - 1570 Words

1: Frame: A: Overview Xerox is a leading business process outsourcing and document management technology and services firm operating out of 180 countries around the world. In 2014, Xerox reported year end revenues of $19,540 million, down 2.3% from 2013, and a net profit of $969 million, up 17.7% from 2013. Xerox’s operations are broken down in to several main segments: Business Process Outsourcing (BPO): Xerox business process outsourcing services provide support functions such as customer care, transaction processing, finance and accounting, and human resources to a broad range of firms and organizations. The BPO services segment is focused on providing support functions to select business groups and industries including healthcare, commercial industries, public sector, and government healthcare. Through its healthcare provider solutions, the firm supports health providers operating in varying capacities to better access patient data, comply with industry regulations, reduce administrative costs, and provide better healthcare services. To commercial and public sector entities, Xerox provides support with transportation and logistics, electronic toll collection, parking management, health and human services, administrative support, and various taxation related functions. Xerox also offers many of these services across major global markets. Document Outsourcing: In its document outsourcing capacity Xerox offers both managed print services and centralized print services.Show MoreRelatedXerox Is A Leading Business Process Outsourcing1570 Words   |  7 Pages1: Frame: A: Overview Xerox is a leading business process outsourcing and document management technology and services firm operating out of 180 countries around the world. 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